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Le Comte de Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

roman/novel, pub:1845-1846, action:1815-1838

     Edmond Dantès is unjustly accused of treason on his wedding day and sent to Le Château d'If, an island prison. He meets another prisoner there, finds out why he was framed, and by whom, and is told of a great treasure left on the Island of Monte-Cristo. He escapes after fourteen years, finds the treasure and assumes the title of the Count of Monte-Cristo. Under this name he exacts revenge on each of the people involved in his imprisonment.
     This is one of Dumas' best-known novels. It was written in 1845-1846. It is one of the novels in which he collaborated with Auguste Maquet.
     Look at the Internet Movie Database's movie listings for a list of characters.




Liens/Links
    El Conde de Montecristo (espagnol/Spanish)
    Il Conte di Montecristo (italien/Italian) (texto)
    Le Comte de Monte Cristo
    Le Comte de Monte Cristo, un site d'information
    The Count of Monte-Cristo (text)
    Carmen Furtado's Count of Monte Cristo page
    fiche bibliographique de Le Comte de Monte-Cristo
    fiche bibliographique de Le Comte de Monte-Cristo (tome 2)
    Introduction to The Count of Monte Cristo
    La construction du château d'If
    La Figure du heros dans Le Comte de Monte-Cristo, memoire par Marie Biglia
    Le Château d'If
    Novel Analysis of The Count of Monte Cristo
    Revue de Le Comte de Monte Christo
    Sinopsis de El Conde de Monte Cristo y La Mano del Muerto (espagnol/Spanish)


Oeuvres/Related Works
    Hogan, Alfredo Possolo: A Mão do Finado - Written in Portuguese (in French Le main de défunt, in English The Hand of the Dead, in German Die Totenhand.)
    Lermina, Jules Hippolyte: Le Fils de Monte Cristo (The Son of Monte-Cristo) - A continuation of Monte-Cristo and the Countess, and sequel to The Count of Monte-Cristo, available from amazon.com.
    Mahalin, Paul: Mademoiselle Monte Cristo - Paris, Librairie illustrée, 1896
    The Count of Monte Cristo I - New York, P. F. Collier & Son, n.d., The Works of Alexandre Dumas in Thirty Volumes (vol. 1), blue cloth, gilt spine
    The Count of Monte Cristo I - New York, P. F. Collier & Son, 1902, The Works of Alexandre Dumas in Thirty Volumes (vol. 1), teal cloth, gilt spine
    The Count of Monte Cristo II - New York, P. F. Collier & Son, n.d., The Works of Alexandre Dumas in Thirty Volumes (vol. 2), blue cloth, gilt spine
    The Countess of Monte-Cristo I - New York, P. F. Collier & Son, n.d., The Works of Alexandre Dumas in Thirty Volumes (vol. 25), blue cloth, gilt spine
    The Countess of Monte-Cristo II - New York, P. F. Collier & Son, n.d., The Works of Alexandre Dumas in Thirty Volumes (vol. 26), blue cloth, gilt spine
    The Son of Monte-Cristo I - New York, P. F. Collier & Son, n.d., The Works of Alexandre Dumas in Thirty Volumes (vol. 27), blue cloth, gilt spine
    The Son of Monte-Cristo II - New York, P. F. Collier & Son, n.d., The Works of Alexandre Dumas in Thirty Volumes (vol. 28), blue cloth, gilt spine


Images (voyez tous/view all)
    "Ah, here is my mother!" cried the viscount
    "Are you displeased with me?" cried Valentine
    "Caderousse started and turned pale. 'False!' he muttered. 'False! Why should that man give me a false diamond?'"
    "Edmond, you will not kill my son?"
    "I tied my lantern to a forked branch I had remarked a year before at the precise spot where I stopped to dig the hole"
    "Look!" said Jacopo
    "One!" said the grave-diggers, "two! three!"
    "Yes!" said Dantes, and he extended his hand to the Catalan with a cordial air
    A receipted bill, with these words on a small slip of parchment, "Julie's Dowry"
    Edmond Dantès and the Abbé Faria imprisoned in the Château d'If
    Nicole's twenty-five louis d'ors
    The Count of Monte Cristo, Classic Comics #3 newer cover
    The Count of Monte Cristo, Classic Comics #3 older cover
    The Count of Monte Cristo, Classics Illustrated #3 cover
    The Count of Monte Cristo, Classics Illustrated #3 painted cover
    Then he double-locked his door


From Notes on the Works of Dumas by C. Conrad Cady:
     Many forgeries and deriviative works have come from the novel The Count of Monte Cristo, but the only ones to come from the hand of Dumas, are the plays Monte Cristo, Le Comte de Morcerf, and Villefort.

By Jules Hippolyte Lermina

     Le Fils de Monte-Cristo
     Paris, L. Boulanger, 1881
     Bibliothèque Nationale de France Notice n° : FRBNF30797359

(This novel was adapted and published in English in two parts: The Wife of Monte Cristo and The Son of Monte Cristo in 1884. [British Library])
     Monte Cristo and the countess.
     New York, N. L. Munro [1884]
     Library of Congress Call Number 07034692

By Jean Charles Du Boys (1836-1873)

     La Comtesse de Monte-Christo
     Paris, E. Dentu, 1869
     Bibliothèque Nationale de France Notice n° : FRBNF30361216

     The Countess of Monte-Cristo.
     Philadelphia, T. B. Peterson & Brothers [c1884]
     Library of Congress Call Number 06035666

     The Countess of Monte-Cristo.
     New York, N. L. Munro [1884]
     Library of Congress Call Number 06034635

By Edmund Flagg (1815-1890)

     Edmond Dantes ... A sequel to The Count of Monte-Cristo.
     Philadelphia, T. B. Peterson & Brothers [c1878]
     Library of Congress Call Number 06041127

     Edmond Dantès.
     Philadelphia, T. B. Peterson & Brothers [c1884]
     Library of Congress Call Number 06041144

     Monte-Cristo's daughter; sequel to Alexander Dumas' great novel, the "Count of Monte-Cristo," and conclusion of "Edmond Dantes."
     Philadelphia, T. B. Peterson [1886]
     Library of Congress Call Number 75310850 //r963

By Alfredo Hogan:

    A Mão do Finado (Le main de défunt, The Hand of the Dead, Die Totenhand)
    written in Portuguese, and when translated into French, it was claimed to be by Dumas

By Paul Mahalin:

     Mademoiselle Monte-Cristo
     Paris : Librairie illustrée, (1896)
     Bibliothèque Nationale de France Notice n° : FRBNF30859575

By John Pennington Marsden:

     Milady Monte Cristo. A novel.
     Osgood & Co., London, 1895.
     British Library Shelfmark: 012628.g.17.

By others:

     Monte Cristo and his wife; a sequel to the Count of Monte Cristo
     New York, J. W. Lovell company [1887]
     Library of Congress Call Number 07034693 //r964

     The Bride of Monte-Cristo. A sequel to "The Count of Monte-Cristo."
     New York, G. Munro [c1884]
     Library of Congress Call Number 06026326

     La jeunesse de Monte-Cristo;
     (I do not know if this is claimed to be by Dumas)
     [Tours] Mame [1954]
     Library of Congress Call Number 55023745

Carmen Furtado's page has more information on the sequels to the story.

From A Bibliography of Alexandre Dumas père by Frank Wild Reed:
     Dumas was under contract with MM. Béthune et Pion to write for them eight volumes of "Impressions de Voyage à Paris." But while he was gathering his material they approached him with the request that he would instead make it a romance after the style of those of Eugène Sue. This he readily agreed to do, and found the germ of an idea in "Le Diamant et la Vengeance," an incident recorded in Peuchet's "La Police Dévoilée."
     The period is 1815-1838. It is perhaps the outstanding work of fiction to reveal the futility of human vengeance, even when it attains its utmost completeness. Maurice Baring calls it the most popular book in the world (presumably meaning in literature as such).
     Dumas commenced with the Roman episodes, with intent that all the earlier portion dealing with the imprisonment, the treasure and the escape should be narrated by one of the characters. It was Manuel who, by strenuous insistence, persuaded him to alter this and make his story begin as it now does at Marseilles. Maquet was undoubtedly the collaborator, for Dumas states that they talked the plan over together, and moreover Maquet helped with at least the latter portions ; and with the first volumes, which are said to have been written at lightning speed at Trouville. As the result of his original idea Dumas divided the romance into three portions : Marseilles, Rome, Paris.
     More than once Dumas spoke of writing a sequel to this romance. He did not do so, nor does it seem to require one, yet others have attempted it.
     It first appeared serially in the "Journal des Débats," where it had an enormous success, only rivalled by that of "Les Trois Mousquetaires." (June 28, 1844 to August 12, 1845.)
     Original edition: Paris, Pétion, 18 vols., 8vo., 1845-46. (M. Parran erroneously says 12 vols., though at the sale of his own library in 1921 one of the few sets known was sold—in 18 vols.)
     Second edition : Paris, Pétion, 12 vols., 1846.
     Third edition : Michel Lévy frères, 6 vols., 18mo., 1846.
     New edition, revised, corrected and augmented with an epilogue; Paris, No. 30 Rue Saint-Thomas-du-Louvre, 2 vols., large 8vo., 1846. Vol. I., pp. 478, with 14 illustrations and a portrait of the author; Vol. II., pp. 499, with 15 illustrations. These plates are by Gavarni and Tony Johannot ; there are in addition woodcut initial letters and tail-pieces. This edition was also issued in parts at 40 centimes each. It was reprinted; Paris, "Écho des Feuilletons," 2 vols., same illustrations, 1850.
     Another edition was given as a bonus to subscribers by "Le Siècle," large 4to. of two columns.
     Paris, Jules Rouff et Cie. (N.D.), in 174 parts, each with a fine woodcut on its front page.
     Paris, Louis Conard, with illustrations from designs by Fred-Money, engraved on wood by Victor Dutertre, 6 vols. 1923.
     In the standard Calmann-Lévy edition it fills six volumes, and a similar number in the same firm's illustrated series, while it occupies one in their "Musée Littéraire."
     Le Vasseur's "Alexandre Dumas Illustré" includes it in Vol. VII., of which it fills the whole.

         References :—
     Dumas: "Causeries,"—"État Civil du 'Comte de Monte-Cristo.' "
     Simon (Gustave): "Histoire d'une Collaboration : Dumas et Maquet."
     Peuchet: "Mémoires Tirés des Archives de la Police de Paris ;" Paris, Levasseur, 6 vols., 1837-38.
     Parran: "Bibliographie d'Alex. Dumas," page 50.
     Quérard: "Supercheries Littéraires Dévoilées," Vol. I., Columns 1107-1108.
     Parigot: "Alexandre Dumas," pp. 149-159.
     Nettement: "Études sur le Feuilleton-Roman ;" Paris. Perrodie, 1845-46, Vol. II., pp. 356-412.
     "Fortnightly Review," No. for October, 1907: "The True History of Monte-Cristo," by R. S. Garnett.
     Dumas' Journal, "Le Monte-Cristo," for June 23rd and 30th, 1859, published "François Picaud," the article from the "Archives de la Police," which gave him his idea.
     "XIX. Century," November, 1922: "Dumas and Sue in English," by W. Roberts.

         Principal English Translations :—
     It first appeared as an illustrated serial in the "London Journal," commencing on April 25th, 1846 and ending on December 18, 1847.
     "The Count of Monte Cristo," first English edition in book format; London, Chapman and Hall, 2 vols., with 20 fine woodcuts by M. Valentin, pp. 464, 464, 1846. No translator's name is given, yet it is interesting to note that almost every successive English edition has been based upon his work. An American reprint was issued in the same year, but with the plates so badly printed as to be almost caricatures of the original ; New York. Burgess, Stringer & Co.
     "The Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Routledge, 2 vols., 8vo., 1852. Frequently reprinted.
     London, Orr, 3 vols., as respectively "The Château d'If" (I) and "The Count of Monte Cristo," (II and III) translated by Emma Hardy. 1846.
     "The Prisoner of If; or, the Revenge of Monte Cristo," illus., pp. 406, 1846. (Also in weekly and monthly parts.) Geo. Peirce.
     At a slightly later date "The Count of Monte Cristo" was issued in eight sixpenny parts by W. Kent & Co., London.
     London, Routledge, 1852, a re-issue of Chapman and Hall's edition, with the plates. Frequently reprinted by Routledge, without the plates; and still in their "Aramis Edition."
     In 1888, however, Routledge printed a very handsome edition in 5 vols., with nearly 500 fine illustrations by French artists, the whole printed on heavy paper of good surface. It contains, as an epilogue, a translation of "François Picaud," the incident from Peuchet which supplied Dumas with the germ of the plot.
     "The Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Dicks, translated and adapted by J. R. Ware, 2 parts, 1887.
     "The Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Ward, Lock, 2 parts, 1888 (unabridged).
     "The Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Osgood, 4 vols., post 8vo., 1891. This closely follows Chapman and Hall's version, though with a few slight variations.
     "The Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Walter Scott, translated by H. L. Williams, 1893.
     "The Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Dent, a reprint of Osgood's edition (though the foreword would lead one to expect a new version), 4 vols., cr. 8vo., 1894. Reprinted, same firm, 1907 and 1927.
     "The Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Walter Scott, revised by H. Smith, illustrated by F. T. Merrill, pp. 1102. 1896. (Based closely on Chapman and Hall's version.)
     "Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Nelson, India paper, 2 vols., 1906.
     "Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Collins, 2 vols., illustrated, 1910. "Count of Monte Cristo;" London, Sampson Low, 4 vols., 1912.

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